Watson Glaser Arguments Section - Samples, Tips, and Hacks [2022]
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Watson Glaser Evaluation of Arguments Section Overview

In each question of the Watson Glaser Evaluation of Arguments section, you will be presented with a yes/no question, followed by an argument.

Your task is to determine whether the argument is strong or weak in answering the question.


Watson Glaser Evaluation of Arguments Sample Question

Should a company grant its employees some free time to spend in any manner they choose?

No—employees are likely to use the free time to clean their homes, run errands, and meet with friends, and thus bring no benefit to the company whatsoever.

 

Strong Argument
Weak Argument
Correct Answer
Incorrect Answer

This argument is both relevant to the topic and important.

  • It is important, as it refers to the benefit the company might (or might not) get from this policy.
  • It is relevant, as it addresses the issue itself – the free time given to employees and its consequences.

Note that the trivial details provided ("...clean their homes, run errands, and meet with friends...") are a distractor intended to make the issue seem trivial – however, they do not change the relevance or importance of the given argument.

Want more questions? Try a free Watson Glaser sample test.


Tips for the Watson Glaser Evaluation of Arguments Section

 

Tip #1 – Ignore Your Own Views

Of all Watson Glaser test sections, the Evaluation of Arguments section is the only one to address actual, relevant social issues – wages, employer-employee relationships, etc.

That is because these topics are where most people tend to let their personal opinions cloud their judgment – don’t let that happen to you.

 

Tip #2 – Importance and Relevance

For an argument to be strong, it must be both important and directly related to the question.

An argument is weak if it is not directly related to the question (even though it may be of great general importance), if it is of minor importance, or if it is only related to trivial aspects of the question.

 

Tip #3 – Regard Arguments as True

In our day-to-day lives, when evaluating arguments, we naturally evaluate how factually true they are.

When evaluating an argument, ALWAYS regard it as true – whether you agree with it or not, even if it seems completely far-fetched.

It is genuinely difficult to develop such a mindset, so practicing it is essential.

 

Tip #4 – Remove the “Fluff”

Removing the “fluff” of the argument is often helpful in seeing the argument for what it actually states.

Let’s take the example from above:

  • No – employees are likely to use the free time to clean their homes, run errands, and meet with friends, and thus bring no benefit to the company whatsoever.

Will turn to:

  • No – free time for employees will not bring any benefit to the company.

It is now easier to see that this argument is both relevant to the topic and touches on the main issue – which was somewhat clouded with all the “fluff” about the ways employees can spend their free time.


Preparing for the Watson Glaser Test

With questions simulating the rules and formatting of the actual Watson Glaser assessment, JobTestPrep’s Complete Watson Glaser Prep Course will help you ace the test, including the Evaluation of Arguments section.

The Most Professional Watson Glaser Prep Course on the Market!

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Covering all test versions and forms: WG-II Form D and Form E, and WG-III.

 

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