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NY Teacher Assistant – Quick Overview Guide

 

Step 1: The ATAS – Prepare for a three-hour test, which will cost $71. The test is conducted via computer and necessitates a background check before you can receive Teaching Certificate Level I.

Step 2: Certificate Level II: From the time you pass the ATAS you will have three years to earn nine college credits while maintaining employment.

Step 3: Certificate Level III – You must complete an additional nine college credits within another three-year period.

 

ATAS Test - Assessment of Teaching Assistant Skills

We are going to look at the four major sections of the Assessment of Teaching Assistant Skills (ATAS,) which covers reading, writing, mathematics, and instructional support. Note that there are a total of 100 questions divided between the various sections.

 

Reading Section:

The reading section of the test will contain a total of 27 questions. The questions will be broken down into several sub-categories, which will include the following:

1: General Vocabulary Words Examples:

  • Choose the right synonyms and antonyms
  • Understanding words in various contexts
  • Correcting words which are often misused like “too and to” or “there and their”

2: Reading Passages Examples:

  • Find the topic sentence
  • Primary idea
  • Find statements which can serve as intro and summary

3: Sequence of Ideas Examples:

  • Cause and relationship throughout the text
  • Create a set of text-based instructions in the proper order
  • Event and steps in the right sequence as found throughout the text

4: Interpretation and Graphs Examples:

  • Pie charts, tables, line and bar graphs
  • Identify textual information in a tabular or graphic form
  • Discern between opinion and fact.

 

Writing Section:

The reading section of the test will contain a total of 27 questions. The questions will be broken down into several sub-categories, which will include the following:

1: Verb examples:

  • Verb tenses (Past, Present, and Future)
  • subject-verb agreement (person and number)
  • Verb Endings

2: Pronouns and modifiers examples:

  • Pronouns (possessive, relative, and demonstrative)
  • Modifiers (superlative and comparative)
  • Pronoun and antecedent connection (Person, Gender, and number)

3: Punctuation and sentence structure examples:

  • Run-on vs. correctly divided sentences
  • Right and wrong punctuation
  • Complete vs fragmented sentences

4: Spelling and capitalization examples:

  • Find mainstream words in proper context
  • Proper titles both regarding capitalization and usage
  • Standard sentence capitalization

 

Math Section:

The reading section of the test will contain a total of 27 questions. The questions will be broken down into several sub-categories, which will include the following:

1: Number concepts examples:

  • Corresponding weights and measures in a variety of units (quarts and pints, feet and inches, etc.)
  • Digits and place values (tenths, ones, tens, hundreds)
  • Rounding up and down numbers
  • Measurements (distance, perimeter, height)

 2:  Whole numbers with examples in addition and subtraction:

  • Addition
  • Subtraction
  • Applying principles of addition and subtraction to everyday problems

3: Whole numbers in division and multiplication examples:

  • Multiplication problems
  • Division problems
  • Using principles of division and multiplication to everyday problems

 4: Fractions, decimals, and percent examples:

  • Fraction problems
  • Decimal problems
  • Percent problems
  • Conversion problems of the above

 

Instructional Support

The reading section of the test will contain a total of 19 questions. The questions will be broken down into several sub-categories, which will include the following in relation to the teacher instructing students within the classroom

1: Reading example:

  • Help students navigate instructional reading skills tools (encyclopedias, multimedia, dictionaries…)
  • Tracking students progress for planning and instruction.
  • Expanding students’ approach to reading (summarizing or skimming)
  • Connecting students background with your teaching style

2:  Writing examples:

  • Help students navigate instructional tools in relation to writing skills (library and grammar books)
  • Tracking students progress for planning and instruction
  • Help students beat writer’s block
  • Proficiency in drafting, editing, and proofreading

3: Mathematics examples:

  • Math in everyday scenarios
  • Help students navigate instructional tools concerning math skills (charts, graphs, rulers)
  • Detecting errors in all basic math disciplines
  • Tracking students progress for planning and instruction.
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